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Here are some of the dumbest questions put to Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch

The process of selecting judges and justices has long since become far too political

(NationalSentinel) Judiciary: He’s clearly a man with a brilliant legal mind and very deferential to the law and the U.S. Constitution – precisely what you’d want in a Supreme Court justice. But some of the questions put to him by Democratic senators during his confirmation hearing on Tuesday were quite frankly beneath him.

It was clear that many questions were inane and served as “gotcha” questions, at best, as reported by Lifezette:

The questioner: Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.).

The issue: Durbin employed a classic guilt-by-association tactic by confronting Gorsuch with controversial statements made by people he has worked with over the years. He noted that retired Oxford University professor John Finnis, who was Gorsuch’s dissertation supervisor, wrote in 2009 that the English people had “largely given up … bearing children at a rate consistent with their community’s medium-term survival” and that it was causing its “own replacement as a people” and that European countries in the 21st century were on a “trajectory of demographic and cultural decay.”

The question: “Do you feel that what Professor Finnis wrote about purity of culture and such is something that we should condemn or congratulate?”

The answer: Gorsuch said he would want to read the entire writing and not just hear excerpts before passing judgment. “And Senator, I’ve had a lot of professors,” he said. “I’ve been blessed with some wonderful professors. And I didn’t agree with everything they’ve said, and I wouldn’t expect them to agree with everything I’ve said.”

The questioner: Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.).

The issue: Klobuchar pressed Gorsuch about his views on originalism, a concept in which judges adhere to the strict meaning of the Constitution when it was written.

The question: “So when the Constitution refers, like, 30-some times to ‘his’ or ‘he’ when describing the president of the United States,  you would see that as, well back then, they thought a woman actually could be president of the United States even though women couldn’t vote?”

The answer: “I’m not looking to take us back to quill pens and horses … Of course women can be president of the United States. I’m the father of two daughters. And I hope one of them turns out to be president.” In response to a similar question about the Air Force, which did not exist at the time of the Constitutional convention, he said, “Senator, I think the generals of the Air Force can rest easy.”

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And so on. He was also asked by Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., for the umpteenth time about the judge’s dissent in a case involving a trucker who was fired for leaving his malfunctioning rig in freezing temperatures (Gorsuch explained that he sympathized with the trucker but was only following the letter of the law when dissenting).

But Gorsuch, despite sitting through 10 hours of interrogation, answered each question thoughtfully and succinctly, each time proving that he was the smartest one in the room, by far.

What kind of justice will he be? In one opinion, he warned, “something distinct, different, and more problematic [is] afoot when the government selectively infringes on a fundamental right.”

You be the judge.

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