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Mueller to announce first indictment Monday in Trump ‘collusion’ probe

“It’s kind of ironic that the people charged with investigating the law and the violations of the law would violate the law”

Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort talks with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos at the GOP convention in August 2016.

(National SentinelTeam Trump: Special counsel Robert Mueller is set to announce the first indictment in his probe of alleged “collusion” between members of the Trump campaign and Russia during last year’s election on Monday, two sources leaked to NBC News.

The sources did not disclose who was set to be indicted or the nature of the charges but did confirm that the announcement would be made tomorrow.

On Friday, CNN was the first to report the Mueller’s office was set to announce its first indictment in the probe in what appeared to be a targeted leak to a friendly news outlet. CNN has been reliably ant-Trump administration throughout President Donald J. Trump’s short tenure.

Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, slammed the leaks, saying that it was obvious someone “violated their oath” of secrecy.

“In the only conversation I’ve had with Robert Mueller, I stressed to him the importance of cutting out the leaks,” Gowdy told “Fox News Sunday.” “It’s kind of ironic that the people charged with investigating the law and the violations of the law would violate the law.”

Gowdy, himself a former federal prosecutor, added: “Make no mistake, disclosing grand jury material is a violation of the law. Somebody violated their oath of secrecy.”

The charges come as calls came last week for Mueller, a former FBI director, to resign. Mueller was head of the bureau when it discovered evidence that Russian operatives were violating laws against racketeering via money laundering and bribery as they worked to get the sale of a Canadian firm company with uranium holdings in the U.S. approved. The company, Uranium One, was eventually sold to Russian state-owned nuclear company Rosatom, which gained control over 20 percent of all strategic U.S. uranium in the deal.

The sale was approved by the Obama administration, which went ahead despite the FBI’s discovery of law-breaking. Reports noted that Mueller failed to notify Congress of the bureau’s findings.

Fox News also reported that Mueller’s investigatory tactics have also been called into question. During a raid by the FBI in July of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort’s Virginia home,  a source close to the investigation told Fox News at the time the scope of the search was “heavy-handed, designed to intimidate.”

In addition, the prosecutor Mueller tapped to help lead the investigation has also come in for some scrutiny. Sydney Powell, a former federal prosecutor, recently wrote about Weissmann in a piece titled, “Judging by Mueller’s staffing choices he may not be very interested in justice.”

Andrew Weissmann, the prosecutor tapped by Mueller to help lead the investigation, has also received criticism. Sidney Powell, a former federal prosecutor recently wrote about Weissman in a piece titled, “Judging by Mueller’s staffing choices, he may not be very interested in justice.”

He accused Weissmann — who once directed the Enron task force — of “prosecutorial overreach” and said that members of Trump’s campaign team could be subject to similar judicial abuse.

“What was supposed to have been a search for Russia’s cyberspace intrusions into our electoral politics has morphed into a malevolent mission targeting friends, family and colleagues of the president,” Powell wrote in The Hill. “The Mueller investigation has become an all-out assault to find crimes to pin on them — and it won’t matter if there are no crimes to be found. This team can make some.”

Powell went on to cite a number of cases where Weissmann won convictions that were later overturned.

There has been speculation that former Trump campaign chairman Manafort and former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn as likely targets.

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